Film: A Good Day to Die (2010)

Presented as part of the American Indian Film Series
Thursday, February 4, 2016 / 6:00pm
Greenbriar Theatre - Plemmons Student Union
Free event

Dennis Banks co-founded the American Indian Movement (A.I.M.) in 1968 to call attention to the plight of urban Indians in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The film presents an intimate look at Dennis Banks' life beginning with his early experience in boarding schools, through his military service in Japan, his transformative experience in Stillwater State Prison and subsequent founding of a movement that, through confrontational actions in Washington DC, Custer South Dakota and Wounded Knee, changed the lives of American Indians forever.

Produced and directed by David Mueller and Lynn Salt.

Trailer

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About the American Indian Film Series

The American Indian Film Series is presented by Appalachian State University’s Gadugi Program and the Native American Student Association.

Gadugi is a partnership between Appalachian State University and Cherokee Central Schools designed to serve Cherokee students and the Eastern Band of Cherokee community. The film series began in 2015 with a screening of The Cherokee Word for Water. Our goal for 2016 was to expand from one film to a series, and thanks to the incredible support of Belk Library and Information Commons, the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, the Office of Equity, Diversity and Compliance and the Office of Student Programs, we have done so.

The Gadugi program made a conscious decision that the films would highlight American Indian issues, biographies and stories from the late twentieth century until today. For too much of American society the American Indian remains as little more than a romanticized stereotype, a relic of a bygone era. The film series seeks to show the vibrant, living modern communities of Indian Country and to proudly proclaim, as did the American Indian Movement, “We Remain.”

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