• Susan M. Branch ’99
  • Sarah Mbiki
  • Kemal Atkins ’92 ’96
  • Ray Christian
  • Guin Thi
  • Traci Royster
  • Brian Shangwa ’15
  • Fidel Leal

Global Thinking, Local Action

  • Thwarting Human Traffickers
    July 18, 2017

    Alumni Matt and Laura Parker run a nonprofit called The Exodus Road that has facilitated the rescue of more than 800 slaves. They credit their Appalachian education with influencing their worldview and what it means to serve others.

  • Social Justice Week

    Social Justice Week (SJW) is a series of events dedicated to addressing some of the world's most pressing social/human rights issues. The third annual event took place in 2017.

  • Making Change
    August 5, 2016

    An Appalachian global studies student takes on fast-fashion, engaging the university along the way to improve conditions for workers producing licensed collegiate apparel.

  • Appalachian stands in solidarity with Orlando
    June 30, 2016

    On Monday, June 13, more than 170 members of the Appalachian State University and High Country community gathered in the Solarium at Plemmons Student Union in remembrance of those whose lives were taken and endangered by the mass shooting in Orlando on Sunday, June 12.

  • Sustained Dialogue Initiative begins Spring 2016
    January 15, 2016

    The Appalachian community is bringing the internationally renowned Sustained Dialogue Initiative to campus. The result will be dialogues designed to cultivate strong, trusting relationships and to foster respect for each individual and their ability to contribute to positive change.

  • Four and a Half Minutes
    December 8, 2014

    A documentation of a student-organized #BlackLivesMatter solidarity demonstration held on Appalachian State University’s campus December 8, 2014.

  • #otherappstate
    October 29, 2014

    On October 29, 2014, students, faculty and staff participated in a silent demonstration to raise awareness about and create support for the “other” part of the App State community.

“As we work toward making meaningful and significant changes on our campus, we cannot help but bear in mind the national conversations that are taking place. These conversations inform our community, but they do not have to define it. We must and will take ownership of our own community and define it for ourselves. Together, we will stand in unity to build and support a just and equitable society, and together, we will reap and share the benefits.”

- Chancellor Sheri N. Everts

College campuses have historically been places where students shine a spotlight on issues of national and international importance, and Appalachian is no exception. Community dialogue around important topics such as race relations, interpersonal violence and other pressing national topics is vital to growth. Demonstrations are a tool in engaging in this dialogue, and can be important catalysts for culture change. Respectful discourse carries with it tremendous educational value. At Appalachian, we are committed to facilitating this discourse. When we can bring discussions of great import that begin on the sidewalk into the classroom, we not only raise awareness about social injustices, but we also begin to effect real and meaningful changes in society.

Chancellor's Message: Stand together in unity

College campuses across the nation, and in North Carolina in particular, were instrumental to the Civil Rights movement 50 years ago. America’s youth, particularly college students, forced our nation to face ugly truths and begin the process of reconciling them. It is fitting that college campuses continue to be a significant and important part of holding our nation accountable for institutionalized racism and acts of violence and injustice.

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