• Fidel Leal
  • Kemal Atkins ’92 ’96
  • Susan M. Branch ’99
  • Brian Shangwa ’15
  • Sarah Mbiki
  • Guin Thi
  • Traci Royster
  • Ray Christian

It Gets Better

March 8, 2012

If you need someone to talk to, there are people who can help. You are not alone.

Contact the Counseling Center or the LGBT Center on campus, or call The Trevor Lifeline 24/7 at 866-488-7386.

Transcript

Natalie Fullam: When I came to Appalachian I was scared to hug people, I was scared to be close to people because I was not comfortable with myself and who I was. I found a group of people who will love me unconditionally. I found my true family here. I have learned to be myself.

Tommy Wrenn: Thanks to my peers, and the staff and the faculty at Appalachian State, I can really walk around each day and I don’t have to worry about being myself.

Linda Coutant: Well I think as we grow older and we have more life experiences we just have a natural deepening of our self-value and our self-acceptance. With that greater self-acceptance comes a greater sense of self-love and when we love ourselves, other people love us. And our whole world can open up. Life just gets better and better as we age, it really does.

Angel Perez: In times when you don’t feel loved because of who you are, it’s because you’re surrounded by people who make you feel bad about yourself. As you progress in life you will find people who are understanding and love you for the person you really are.

Johnny Burleson: From the moment I stepped foot on this campus, I knew that this was a special place. You hear the term the Appalachian Family a lot and it really is, it really is a family. It’s a very supportive community and I’ve not felt any more supported anywhere else like I have here at Appalachian.

Caroline Noel: Before I came up to Appalachian I could never feel like I could tell anyone about me or how I was feeling until I met the group Transaction and made friends there and met people with similar interests and similar problems and feelings and then I could be myself.

Shelby Forsyth: When I came to Appalachian I befriended people who when I came out to them said “Psst, okay” and we went on to discuss other things. It was like nothing to them, it didn’t matter and they loved me for who I was and who I am.

Dr. Peacock: At Appalachian we are a family. I believe it in my heart. I see it in the faces and eyes of our faculty, our staff and our students.

Tommy: It gets better.

Angel: It gets better.

Natalie: It does get better.

Johnny: It really, really does get better.

Linda: Life just gets better. Everything gets better.

Dr. Peacock: At Appalachian it really does get better.

Shelby: It gets better. It gets much, much better.

Caroline: It gets better.

(Music outro; Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina comes on screen)