Events

  • Sanctuaries of White Supremacy: Boundaries of White Space(s) and White Resistance to Change
    Feb 22
    Thursday, February 22, 2018
    7:30pm

    Dr. David G. Embrick will address recent battles, both overt and subtle, regarding the removal of confederate statues and other symbols of white supremacy, often assumed as a necessary action if the United States, as a nation, is to move forward in terms of its racist past.

  • Screening: The World Made Straight (2015)
    Feb 27
    Tuesday, February 27, 2018
    5:00pm-7:00pm

    In a rural Appalachian community haunted by the legacy of a Civil War massacre, a rebellious young man struggles to escape the violence that would bind him to the past.

  • Natalie MacMaster & Donnell Leahy: Visions of Cape Breton and Beyond
    Feb 27
    Tuesday, February 27, 2018
    7:00pm
    Schaefer Center for the Performing Arts

    Fierce fiddling duo command the stage with an explosive celebration of raw energy and passion that infuses their traditional heritage with their taste for the contemporary.

  • Film and Q&A with director Christopher Everett: Wilmington on Fire (2015)
    Feb 28
    Wednesday, February 28, 2018
    6:30pm

    Christopher Everett is a writer, film director and film producer from Laurinburg, North Carolina. He recently directed his first feature-length documentary film entitled "Wilmington on Fire" which chronicles the 1898 Wilmington Massacre in Wilmington, North Carolina.

  • Families in Conflict: An Un-Civil War
    Mar 1
    Thursday, March 1, 2018
    5:30pm-8:30pm

    Discuss “Time of Drums” and the Liljenquist Family Collection. Some points to consider: What role does the border conflict play in shaping character in this novel? What questions of morality and sacrifice emerge from the novel? What do the Liljenquist photographs reveal about the soldiers who fought in the War? What do they indicate about the nature of the war as an expression of social class and social identity?

  • Singing for Speech & Hearing
    Mar 12
    Monday, March 12, 2018
    6:00pm

    A National Student Speech-Language and Hearing Association fundraiser. All proceeds will be donated to the Appalachian Speech and Hearing Clinic. This year, "Singing for Speech" will feature many different A Capella groups. So be sure to come listen to some great music that will benefit an even greater cause!

  • SDAP Coffee Talk
    Mar 16
    Friday, March 16, 2018
    8:45am-10:15am

    Love coffee? How about breakfast treats? Care to score some free smiles? Look no further! The Scholars with Diverse Abilities Program (SDAP) Coffee Talk series promotes interaction between people of all abilities.

  • Golden Dragon Acrobats
    Mar 16
    Friday, March 16, 2018
    7:00pm
    Schaefer Center for the Performing Arts

    The Golden Dragon Acrobats combine award-winning acrobatics, traditional dance, spectacular costumes, ancient and contemporary music and theatrical techniques to present a show of breathtaking skill and spellbinding beauty.

  • Defiance and Protest: Forgotten Individual Jewish Reactions to the Persecution in Nazi Germany
    Mar 19
    Monday, March 19, 2018
    7:00pm

    Renowned Holocaust scholar Professor Wolf Gruner holds the Shapell-Guerin Chair in Jewish Studies, is Professor of History at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and is the Founding Director of the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research.

  • Genocide Testimonies in the Classroom and Research: Exploring the USC Shoah Foundation Archive
    Mar 20
    Tuesday, March 20, 2018
    12:00pm-2:00pm

    Facilitated by Professor Wolf Gruner, workshop participants will have full access to the Foundation’s Visual History Archive that contains over 54,000 video testimonies of survivors and other eyewitnesses of the Holocaust, the Rwandan, Armenian, Cambodian, and Guatemalan genocides, and the Nanjing Massacre in China.

  • Anne Waldman: The Creative Rhizome: Generative Practices in Art & Life
    Mar 22
    Thursday, March 22, 2018
    3:30pm

    Anne Waldman is a poet, performer, professor, editor, cultural activist, and co-founder with Allen Ginsberg of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at Naropa University. She is the author of over forty books of poetry, including “Manatee/Humanity” and the feminist epic “The Iovis Trilogy: Colors in the Mechanism of Concealment.” Book sales and signing will follow.

  • Screening: Apocalypse Now (1979)
    Mar 22
    Thursday, March 22, 2018
    5:00pm-9:00pm

    During the Vietnam War, Captain Willard is sent on a dangerous mission into Cambodia to assassinate a renegade Colonel who has set himself up as a god among a local tribe.

  • Anne Waldman
    Mar 22
    Thursday, March 22, 2018
    7:30pm

    Anne Waldman is a poet, performer, professor, editor, cultural activist, and co-founder with Allen Ginsberg of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at Naropa University. She is the author of over forty books of poetry, including “Manatee/Humanity” and the feminist epic “The Iovis Trilogy: Colors in the Mechanism of Concealment.” Book sales and signing will follow.

  • Friend or Foe? The Vietnam War
    Mar 24
    Saturday, March 24, 2018
    10:00am-1:00pm

    Discuss “The Sympathizer.” Things to think about: What types of borders does the protagonist navigate and how does that impact his relationships with friends, his homeland, and his political orientation? How does Nguyen’s novel differ from representations of the Vietnam War in “Apocalypse Now?”

  • Calvin Baker: Craft Talk
    Mar 29
    Thursday, March 29, 2018
    2:00pm

    Calvin Baker is an American novelist, essayist, and editor who has chronicled the African American experience from the Colonial era to the present, centering the Black voice and perspective within the context of trans-Atlantic history. Among his concerns are constructions of American identity, cosmopolitanism, post-colonialism, modernity, geography, and science. Book sales and signing will follow.

  • Antifa: The History and Theory of Antifascist Resistance
    Mar 29
    Thursday, March 29, 2018
    7:00pm-9:00pm

    Dr. Mark Bray is a historian of human rights, terrorism, and political radicalism in Modern Europe, who completed his PhD in Modern European and Women's and Gender History at Rutgers University in 2016. He is the author of The Anti-Fascist Handbook and Translating Anarchy: The Anarchism of Occupy Wall Street.

  • Calvin Baker
    Mar 29
    Thursday, March 29, 2018
    7:30pm

    Calvin Baker is an American novelist, essayist, and editor who has chronicled the African American experience from the Colonial era to the present, centering the Black voice and perspective within the context of trans-Atlantic history. Among his concerns are constructions of American identity, cosmopolitanism, post-colonialism, modernity, geography, and science. Book sales and signing will follow.

  • Film: The Murderers Are Among Us (Die Moerder sind unter uns) (DEFA 1946)
    Apr 4
    Wednesday, April 4, 2018
    7:30pm

    Center for Judaic, Holocaust and Peace Studies director Dr. T. Pegelow Kaplan will introduce the critically-acclaimed early German postwar film and evaluate its role in addressing and failing to address the country's recent mass crimes.

  • Screening: The Other Side of War (1990)
    Apr 5
    Thursday, April 5, 2018
    5:00pm-7:00pm

    This 60-minute documentary by Fred Milano, professor emeritus of sociology at Appalachian, examines a controversial topic that was largely ignored --- the role of American women in the Vietnam War, 1964-1973. The film consists entirely of interviews with female nurses and Red Cross volunteers.

  • The Hero Twins: Blood Race
    Apr 6

    8
    April 6-8, 2018

    Competing in the ancient Blood Race, a stonecutter named Moth descends into the underworld to free her twin brother, Cricket, who is trapped there. An original story inspired by classic Mayan mythology, Ramón Esquivel's The Hero Twins: Blood Race employs parkour, free running, capoeira, and other martial arts and dance forms to weave a tale of determination, discovery, and liberation.

  • 2018 AppKIDS Superhero 5K
    Apr 7
    Saturday, April 7, 2018

    Come support a great cause and run a 5K. Registration is open for individuals or sign up with your friends as a team. All race proceeds go to AppKIDS. Costume contest for best SUPERHERO! USATF certified course is on the campus of Appalachian.

  • A Woman’s Journey to War and Back
    Apr 7
    Saturday, April 7, 2018
    10:00am-1:00pm

    Discuss “American Daughter Gone to War.” How does Smith negotiate the terrain of military bases ill-equipped for female service members? What different dangers and stressors does she face as opposed to her male counterparts? How do Smith’s definitions of family change once she is deployed to Vietnam? How do Smith’s ideas of moral superiority and patriotism shift over time, both while she is in Vietnam and once she returns stateside?

  • Yom HaShoah
    Apr 12
    Thursday, April 12, 2018
    10:00am-6:00pm

    On Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Memorial Day), the Center for Judaic Holocaust, and Peace Studies along with the Temple of the High Country and Appalachian’s Hillel chapter will organize a public reading of the names of European Jews murdered by the Germans and their allies during the Holocaust.

  • SDAP Coffee Talk
    Apr 13
    Friday, April 13, 2018
    8:45am-10:15am

    Love coffee? How about breakfast treats? Care to score some free smiles? Look no further! The Scholars with Diverse Abilities Program (SDAP) Coffee Talk series promotes interaction between people of all abilities.

  • Women, the Military, War, and Its Aftermath
    Apr 13

    14
    April 13-14, 2018

    The Appalachian Veterans Arts & Humanities Collective, in collaboration with Blurred Boundaries, will host “Women, The Military, War & Its Aftermath” to explore the importance of women’s voices regarding military service, war, its aftermath, and the nearly invisible role of women and families left stateside.

  • Dennis Covington: Taking Risks, Staying Sane: The Place Where Nonfiction and Fiction Intersect
    Apr 19
    Thursday, April 19, 2018
    2:00pm

    Dennis Covington's subject matter includes spirituality, the environment, and the South. Covington's book “Salvation on Sand Mountain” was a 1995 National Book Award finalist and his articles have been published in The New York Times, Vogue, and Redbook. His most recent book, “Revelation: A Search for Faith in a Violent Religious World,” chronicles his travels in Syria during the on-going civil war. Book sales and signing will follow.

  • Broken Lives: How Ordinary German Jews and Gentiles Experienced the Twentieth Century
    Apr 19
    Thursday, April 19, 2018
    7:30pm

    Eminent historian Prof. Konrad H. Jarausch, Lurcy Professor of European Civilization at UNC-Chapel Hill, will give an evening lecture. His talk will also be part of the events co-organized by the Center for Judaic, Holocaust and Peace Studies to mark the 70th anniversary of the founding of the state of Israel.

  • Dennis Covington
    Apr 19
    Thursday, April 19, 2018
    7:30pm

    Dennis Covington's subject matter includes spirituality, the environment, and the South. Covington's book “Salvation on Sand Mountain” was a 1995 National Book Award finalist and his articles have been published in The New York Times, Vogue, and Redbook. His most recent book, “Revelation: A Search for Faith in a Violent Religious World,” chronicles his travels in Syria during the on-going civil war. Book sales and signing will follow.

  • Black Violin
    Apr 20
    Friday, April 20, 2018
    7:00pm
    Schaefer Center for the Performing Arts

    Black Violin is composed of classically trained violist and violinist Wil B. and Kev Marcus who combine their classical training and and hip-hop influences to create a distinctive multi-genre sound that is often described as “classical boom.”

  • Linda Hogan: Craft Talk
    Apr 26
    Thursday, April 26, 2018
    3:30pm

    Linda Hogan is a former faculty member at the Indian Arts Institute, Writer in Residence for the Chickasaw Nation, and Professor Emerita at the University of Colorado. Recent volumes include “DARK. SWEET. New and Selected Poems;” “Indios;” “Rounding the Human Corners;” and “People of the Whale.” She is also the author of “Mean Spirit,” a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Book sales and signing will follow.

  • Anti-Semitism in the Chartist Movement: Rife or Rare?
    Apr 26
    Thursday, April 26, 2018
    7:00pm

    Chartism, at its height in the late 1830s to late 1840s, was the largest and most important popular political mobilization in British history. Dr. Denis Paz, from the University of North Texas, will discuss the movement and its context and focus, in particular, on how historians of Chartism have treated the problem of antisemitism.

  • Linda Hogan
    Apr 26
    Thursday, April 26, 2018
    7:30pm

    Linda Hogan is a former faculty member at the Indian Arts Institute, Writer in Residence for the Chickasaw Nation, and Professor Emerita at the University of Colorado. Recent volumes include “DARK. SWEET. New and Selected Poems;” “Indios;” “Rounding the Human Corners;” and “People of the Whale.” She is also the author of “Mean Spirit,” a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Book sales and signing will follow.

  • Blurred Boundaries: Our Own Stories
    Apr 28
    Saturday, April 28, 2018
    10:00am-1:00pm

    On this, our final meeting, participants will share their own stories of the experience of war and are encouraged to create their stories through a variety of written and/or visual media.